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Burlington

General Information Burlington is a city located in Southern Ontario at the western end of Lake Ontario, lying between the north shore of Lake Ontario and the ridge of the Niagara Escarpment. Its geographic position puts it roughly in the centre of the Golden Horseshoe region, a dynamic location with many attractions. While it contains both some small industrial areas and high-tech companies, Burlington is primarily a bedroom suburb of both Toronto and Hamilton. Burlington bears many similarities to the neighboring town of Oakville, including a high per capita income amongst its residents and a thriving downtown heritage area. Burlington's Demographics:
As recorded in the latest census, 91.04% of the population was white. Other groups include South Asian: 3.1%, mixed race: 1.5%, black: 1.5%, and Chinese: 1.3%. The top eight ethnic origins from the 2006 census are listed in the accompanying table. Percentages add up to more than 100% because respondents were able to choose more than one ethnicity.
Economy:
Burlington's economic strength is the diversity of its economic base, mainly achieved because of its geography, proximity to large industries in southern Ontario (Canada's largest consumer market), its location within the Greater Toronto Area (GTA) and proximity to Hamilton, and its transportation infrastructure. The city has a robust economy with potential for future growth - it is located at the hub of the Golden Horseshoe, is largely driven by both the automotive and manufacturing sectors and has been named to 3rd best city to live in Canada. There are also many stores and shops in Burlington. The Burlington Mall and Mapleview Centre are popular malls within the city. The many summer festivals in the city, including Canada's Largest Ribfest, and the Burlington Sound of Music Festival which also attract many visitors.
Attractions:
Burlington shares the Royal Botanical Gardens, Canada's largest botanical garden with neighbouring Hamilton, which incorporates both untamed and cultivated landscapes. There are 75 parks and 325 ha (800 acres) of parkland within the city, the largest being Lasalle Park located in Aldershot and Spencer Smith Park newly renovated & located centrally, also on the shore of Lake Ontario. Lasalle Park, is owned by the city of Hamilton but is leased by Burlington, which also assumes responsibility for maintenance. Mount Nemo Conservation Area is the only area in Burlington operated by the Halton Region Conservation Authority. Kerncliff Park, in an abandoned quarry on the boundary with Waterdown, is a naturalized area on the lip of the Niagara Escarpment. The Bruce Trail runs through the park, at many points running along the edge of the cliffs, providing a clear overlook of Burlington, the Burlington Skyway Bridge, Hamilton, and Oakville. On a clear day, one can see the CN Tower in Toronto, approximately 50 kilometres (31 mi) from the park. The Burlington Art Centre shows various exhibits throughout the year from local to national talent, including the Canadian artist Robert Bateman. The Burlington Art Centre holds the world’s largest collection of Contemporary Canadian Ceramics, many pieces of which are on permanent display. The Joseph Brant Museum and Ireland House, which showcase the history of Burlington, are also popular attractions. There are no large-scale stadiums, arenas, theatre or opera companies in Burlington. However, in 2008, city council approved the construction of a Performing Arts Centre on Locust Street, in the downtown core. The Performing Arts Centre is designed by Diamond and Schmitt Architects who also designed Toronto's Four Seasons Centre for the Performing Arts. Many annual lakefront activities take place in Spencer Smith Park, including Canada's Largest Ribfest and the Sound of Music Festival. There is also the semi-annual Taste of Burlington Dining event.




Mississauga

General Information
is a Canadian city in Southern Ontario on the shores of Lake Ontario, located in the Regional Municipality of Peel, in the western part of the Greater Toronto Area. The city has a population of 713,443 as of the Canada 2011 Census, and is Canada's sixth-most populous municipality. Developed as a suburb of Toronto, Mississauga's growth is attributed to its proximity to that city. It is the 37th largest suburb in the world by population, and the 4th largest in North America. The city is debt-free and has not borrowed money since 1978. Mississauga has been the beneficiary of federal infrastructure funding but may have to borrow money to build new capital projects in 2012. Residents of the city are called Mississaugans. The city is placed fourth in 'large cities of the future' by fDi Magazine for North and South American cities. Mississauga was also rated as Canada's 11th best city to live in terms of prosperity according to MoneySense magazine. Toronto Pearson International Airport, Canada's busiest airport is located in the city, and it is the location of several major corporate headquarters for Canada such as Walmart Canada and Target Canada.
Mississauga's Demographics:
Mississauga is a fast-growing and multicultural city. Statistics Canada estimates that Mississauga now has 734,000 people, an increase of 150,000 from the previous decade and the population has roughly doubled in past twenty-five years. Mississauga is now the third most populous city on the Great Lakes; far smaller than Chicago and Toronto, but recently surpassing the cities proper of Detroit, Milwaukee, and Cleveland. About 44% of the population speaks a language other than English, and 40% of the population are members of a visible minority (non-white or non-aboriginal). 21.29% of the population is under 14 years of age, compared to those of retirement age; 8.51%. The median (middle) age in Mississauga is 35.0. Christianity is the majority faith of the city. The 2001 census indicated that 69.78% of the population adhere to Christianity, with Catholics constituting 42.00%, while the remaining 27.78% adhere to various Protestant, and Orthodox Christian groups. Other practiced faiths were Islam (6.83%), Hinduism (4.73%) Sikhism (3.82%), Buddhism, and Judaism. Languages The 2006 census found that English was spoken as mother tongue by 49.3% of the population. The next most common languages were the Chinese languages (5.5%), Urdu (4.6%), Polish (4.4%), Punjabi (3.6%), Portuguese (2.8%), Tagalog (2.7%), Arabic (2.6%), Italian (2.5%) and Spanish (2.1%).
Economy:
Over 60 of the Fortune 500 base their Global or Canadian Head Offices in Mississauga. Some of the strongest industries are pharmaceuticals, banking and finance, electronics and computers, transportation parts and equipment industries.[citation needed] Citibank Canada, has 2 corporate IT development centres in Mississauga. TD Bank Financial, also has 3 Corporate IT development centres in Mississauga along with Royal Bank of Canada. Microsoft Canada is also located in Mississauga, and Menu Foods, a cat and dog food manufacturer, is headquartered in the Streetsville area of Mississauga. Hewlett Packard's main Canada offices are in Mississauga. Air Georgian, a regional airline, is headquartered in Mississauga. Air Canada Jazz operates a regional office in Mississauga. Kam Air has its North American office in Mississauga. In addition both Walmart Canada and Target Canada have their Canada head offices in Mississauga..
Attractions:
In 2006, with the help of Project for Public Spaces, the city started hosting "My Mississauga" summer festivities at its civic square. Mississauga planned over 60 free events to bring more people to the city square. The square was transformed and included a movable stage, a snack bar, extra seating, and sports and gaming facilities (basketball nets, hockey arena, chess and checker boards) including a skate park. Some of the events included Senior's day on Tuesday, Family day on Wednesday, Vintage car Thursdays, with the main events being the Canada Day celebration, Rotary Ribfest, and Beachfest. The civic square has completed its restructuring project as of 2011, using federal stimulus money, which features a permanent stage, a larger ice rink, media screens, and a permanent restaurant. Mississauga also boasts one of the largest shopping malls in Canada called Square One Shopping Centre, which is surrounded by several bars and restaurants, as well as City Hall, the Central Library, and Playdium. Mississauga also hosts a cultural festival named Carassauga each year to celebrate the diverse population. Mississauga is home to Mosaic, the largest South Asian multi-disciplinary arts festival in North America. Now in its sixth year Mosaic is a completely free festival that attracts 50,000 people in three days.

Milton:

General Information
Milton (2011 census population 84,362) is a town in Southern OntarioCanada, and part of the Halton Region in the Greater Toronto Area. The town received a significant amount of attention after the 2006 census indicated that Milton was the fastest growing municipality in the Greater Golden Horseshoe, with a 71.4% increase in population between 2001 and 2006.[3] In early 2012, the town's planner estimated Milton's population to be between 94,000 and 95,000.[4]

Milton is located 40 km (25 mi) west of Downtown Toronto on Highway 401, and is the western terminus for the Milton line commuter train and bus corridor operated by GO Transit. Milton is on the edge of Niagara Escarpment, a UNESCO world biosphere reserve and the Bruce Trail. The town also boasts one of the highest household incomes in the GTA.
Demographics:
According to the Canada 2011 Census there were 84,362 people living in Milton, and its population in 2006 was 53,939, representing an increase of 56.5%. The 2011 Census counted 28,049 housing units and 27,561 being occupied. The average population density per square kilometre was 85.9 persons. Age distribution indicated 26.4% of the population was 19 and younger, 63.1% of the population ages 20–64 and 10.5% 65 and older. The median income for a household in the town was $39,795. The average household income for a family with two earners was $91,384. With one earner in a family, $56,043. Males had an average income of $40,069 versus $35,897 for females. 27.1% of the population had completed high school. 11.4% a Trades certificate or diploma. 24.9% College. 23.0% University. 15.7% of the population had not completed high school. As of the 2006 census, 17% of residents were a visible minority. According to the 2011 Census,[6] English is the mother tongue for 69.5% of the population, down from 77.6% in the 2006 Census.[7] However, the absolute number of native English speakers actually increased (58,140 in 2011, from 41,430 in 2006), but the increase in the absolute number of non-English native speakers was even higher, thus explaining the decrease in its relative proportion of English as mother tongue in the population. French is the mother tongue for 1.5% of the population. Immigrant languages with the most notable proportions of native speakers are Urdu (4.3%), Polish (2.2%), Spanish (2.1%), and Panjabi (Punjabi) (1.6%).
Attractions:
Every Labour Day weekend the Milton Steam-Era takes place. Steam-Era is the annual show produced by the "Ontario Steam & Antique Preservers Association" held at the Milton Fairgrounds. Steam engines from the 19th century puff their way around the grounds. Hundreds of tractors and stationary engines, along with antique cars, models and agricultural displays recreate life in the country a 100 years ago. The Milton Fall Fair is held every year on the last weekend of September. The Fall Fair has been a tradition in the town for over 60 years. Events include: Agricultural show, midway, livestock, entertainment, the Demolition Derby and other traditional county fair events. The event takes place at the Milton Fairgrounds located in the historic downtown area of Milton. A farmers' market operates on Main Street in downtown Milton on Saturdays 8am-Noon, from May through October. The section of Main Street that hosts the market is closed off to vehicles during the event.

 




Oakville

General Information
Oakville is a town in Halton Region, on Lake Ontario in Southern Ontario, Canada, and is part of the Greater Toronto Area. As of the 2011 census the population was 182,520.
Oakville's Demographics:
According to the 2011 Canadian Census Oakville had 182,520 residents. This represents a 10.2% increase since the 2006 Census.[2] According to the 2006 census, Oakville had a younger population than Canada as a whole. Minors (youth under 19 years of age) totalled 28.1 percent of the population compared to pensioners who number 11.7 percent. This compares with the Canadian average of 24.4 percent (minors) and 13.7 percent (pensioners).
Because of its proximity to Toronto, Oakville is becoming increasingly diverse. As of 2006, 81.2% of the population was white. Other groups include South Asian: 6.0%, Chinese: 3.2%, black: 2.1%, and mixed race: 2%[18] 79.4% of residents stated their religion as Christian, almost evenly split between Roman Catholics and Protestants. Non-Christian religions include Islam: 2.0%, Hinduism: 1.3%, Sikhism: 1.1%, and Judaism: 0.7%. 14% indicated no religion. The median household income was $83,982 with an average house value of $306,209
Economy:
Oakville has the people, the place and the partners to build your business success. International industry leaders like Siemens, Goodrich Landing Gear, AMEC and SNC Lavalin have already taken advantage of our workforce capabilities to drive innovation and build sector leadership — come see what Oakville can do for your business. Oakville is the premium location for a vibrant work-life balance desired by professionals. Located at the epicentre of Canada's golden horseshoe, it's no wonder many market-leading companies continue to choose Oakville as their place to do business..
Attractions:
Downtown Oakville Jazz Festival
The Downtown Oakville Jazz Festival is an annual summer jazz festival that has taken place every year since 1992. The event includes performances at a number of stages along Lakeshore Road East in downtown Oakville. As the festival is fully funded by the Downtown Oakville Business Improvement Area (BIA), the event is free to the public.
Waterfront Festival
Beginning in 1982, Oakville's Coronation Park played host to the annual Oakville Waterfront Festival. Among a range of events, the festival included small amusement park rides, arts and crafts, food and drinks, free concerts headlined by Canadian bands, and nightly fireworks displays. The Waterfront Festival took place in late June of each year until 2010, when it was cancelled due to financial difficulties,[26] despite having annual attendance of up to 100,000 visitors. Past headliners at the Waterfront Festival included Jann Arden, Oakville resident Tom Cochrane, Great Big Sea, Alannah Myles, Blue Rodeo, Susan Aglukark, Michelle Wright, Jacksoul, Colin James, The Philosopher Kings, Jesse Cook, Finger Eleven, Justin Hines, Bedouin Soundclash, Ill Scarlett, Jully Black, and Hedley. For the Love of the Arts Festival
The For the Love of the Arts Festival
is an annual event taking place in the late spring in Oakville. Inaugurated in 2002, the event is hosted by CommUnity Arts Space [1], a local umbrella group advocating for shared physical space for Oakville's arts and cultural groups. Currently the only such multi-disciplinary community festival of its kind in Oakville, the event serves to showcase local talent, skills, crafts, literary art, dance performances, theatre groups and music performances. The event is intended as a symbolic presentation of a "shared space" and is entirely sponsored by local corporate and private donations.
Midnight Madness
Downtown Oakville also hosts an annual street festival known as Midnight Madness. The event typically takes place during the month of July and provides an opportunity for local stores and vendors to showcase new products and sales, as well as a venue for local artists to perform at a number of street-level stages.



Toronto

General Information
is the largest city in Canada and the provincial capital of Ontario. It is located in Southern Ontario on the northwestern shore of Lake Ontario. A relatively modern city, Toronto's history dates back to the late 18th century, when its land was first purchased by the British monarchy from the Mississaugas of the New Credit. The settlement was later established as the Town of York and proclaimed as the new capital of Upper Canada by its lieutenant-governor, John Graves Simcoe. In 1834, York was incorporated as a city and renamed to its present name. The city was ransacked in the Battle of York during the War of 1812 and damaged in two great fires in 1849 and in 1904. Since its incorporation, Toronto has repeatedly expanded its borders through amalgamation with surrounding municipalities, most recently in 1998. The city has 2.6 million residents, according to the 2011 Census. It is currently the fifth most populous city in North America. The census metropolitan area (CMA) had a population of 5,583,064, and the Greater Toronto Area (GTA) had a population of 6,054,191 in the 2011 Census. Toronto is at the heart of the Greater Toronto Area, and the densely populated region in Southern Ontario known as the Golden Horseshoe. Its cosmopolitan and international population reflects its role as an important destination for immigrants to Canada. Toronto is one of the world's most diverse cities by percentage of non-native-born residents, with about 49% of the population born outside Canada. Toronto is also consistently rated as one of the world's most livable cities by the Economist Intelligence Unit and the Mercer Quality of Living Survey. As Canada's commercial capital, it is home to the Toronto Stock Exchange and the nation's five largest banks. Toronto is considered an alpha world city by the Globalization and World Cities (GaWC) study group. Toronto's leading economic sectors include finance, business services, telecommunications, aerospace, transportation, media, arts, publishing, software production, medical research, education, tourism, and engineering.
Toronto's Demographics:
The city's population grew by 4% (96,073 residents) between 1996 and 2001, 1% (21,787 residents) between 2001 and 2006, and 4.3% (111,779 residents) between 2006 and 2011. Persons aged 14 years and under made up 17.5% of the population, and those aged 65 years and over made up 13.6%. The median age was 36.9 years. Foreign-born people made up 49.9% of the population.[64] The city's gender population is 48% male and 52% female. However, women outnumber men in all age groups over 20. As of 2006, 46.9% of the residents of the city proper belong to a visible minority group, and visible minorities are projected to comprise a majority in the Toronto CMA by 2017. In 1981, Toronto's visible minority population was 13.6%. According to the United Nations Development Programme, Toronto has the second-highest percentage of constant foreign-born population among world cities, after Miami, Florida. While Miami's foreign-born population consists mostly of Cubans and other Latin Americans, no single nationality or culture dominates Toronto's immigrant population, placing it among the most diverse cities in the world.[64] By 2031, Toronto's current visible minority population will have increased to 63%, changing the definition of visible minority in the city. More than 100,000 immigrants arrive in the Toronto area every year. In 2006, people of European ethnicities formed the largest cluster of ethnic groups in Toronto, 52.6%,[67] mostly of British, Irish, Italian, and French origins. The five largest visible minority groups in Toronto are South Asian (12.0%), Chinese (11.4%), Black (8.4%), Filipino (4.1%) and Latin American (2.6%).[67] Aboriginal peoples, who are not considered visible minorities, formed 0.5% of the population. This diversity is reflected in Toronto's ethnic neighbourhoods, which include Chinatown, Corso Italia, Greektown, Kensington Market, Koreatown, Little India, Little Italy, Little Jamaica, Little Portugal and Roncesvalles. Christianity is the largest religious group in Toronto. The 2001 Census reports that 33.4% of the city's population is Catholic, followed by Protestant (21.1%), Christian Orthodox at (4.8%), Coptic Orthodox (0.2%),[72] and other Christians (3.9%). Due to the city's significant number of Methodist Christians, Toronto is sometimes referred to as the Methodist Rome. Other religions in the city are Islam (5.5%), Hinduism (4.1%), Judaism (3.5%), Buddhism (2.1%), Sikhism (1.9%), and other Eastern religions (0.2%). 16.6% of the population professes no religion. While English is the predominant language spoken by Torontonians, many other languages have considerable numbers of local speakers. The varieties of Chinese and Italian are the second and third most widely spoken languages at work. As a result, the city's 9-1-1 emergency services are equipped to respond in over 150 languages..
Economy:
Toronto is an international centre for business and finance. Generally considered the financial capital of Canada, Toronto has a high concentration of banks and brokerage firms on Bay Street, in the Financial District. The Toronto Stock Exchange is the world's seventh-largest stock exchange by market capitalization. The five largest financial institutions of Canada, collectively known as the Big Five, are headquartered in Toronto.
Attractions:
Canadian National Tower Toronto's most famous landmark is the CN Tower, a 553 metre- (1,815 foot-) tall steel and concrete transmission tower and observation deck, which is one of the tallest structures in the world.
Sports stadium
The Rogers Centre (formerly SkyDome) is the world's first sporting arena to feature a fully retractable roof. It is currently home to the Toronto Blue Jays (baseball) and the Toronto Argonauts (Canadian football). Nearby, the Air Canada Centre is the home of the Toronto Maple Leafs (ice hockey), the Toronto Raptors (basketball), and the Toronto Rock (box lacrosse). It was built to replace the legendary Maple Leaf Gardens. Additionally, there is BMO Field, which the home to the MLS team Toronto FC (association football).
City Hall
Toronto's City Hall is one of the city's most distinctive landmarks. Built to replace its predecessor — now known simply as Old City Hall — its modernist style still impresses today (it has been used as a backdrop in American films to depict a city of the future). Directly in front of City Hall is Nathan Phillips Square, a public space that frequently houses concerts, art displays, a weekly farmers' market, and other public events. It is also the site of a reflecting pool that, during the winter, becomes a popular skating rink.
Yonge-Dundas Square
Yonge-Dundas Square is the city's newest and flashiest public square, located across the street from the Toronto Eaton Centre, a large, popular shopping mall long enough to have Toronto Transit Commission subway stops at both the northern and southern ends of the mall. Another upscale shopping mall with subway access is the Yorkdale Shopping Centre, although this mall sits outside of the city centre at the intersection of two highways, Allen Road and the 401. Queen's Park, an historic scenic park and public space, surrounds Ontario's Legislative Assembly.
The Toronto Islands
The Toronto Islands form part of the largest car-free urban community in North America. Accessible by ferry, "the Islands" include a public park and a children's amusement park, Centreville. The city has several large forested urban parks, the best known being High Park to the west of downtown. The city is crisscrossed by a network of ravines that have remained almost wholly undeveloped. The Martin M. Goodman trail also traverses the entire lakeshore from one end of the city to the other, a section of this trail runs as a Boardwalk through the Beaches area, from Ashbridges Bay to Victoria Park Avenue. The Scarborough Bluffs are majestic cliffs along much of Scarborough's shores.
Toronto's oldest cathedrals
The Roman Catholic St. Michael's Cathedral and the Anglican St. James' Cathedral are both on Church Street.
The Distillery District
The Distillery District is a collection of old and restored industrial buildings from the 19th century which now feature artworks and historical artifacts from Toronto's early industrial past.
Casa Loma
Casa Loma, Spanish for "Hill House", is a castle overlooking downtown Toronto, it is one of the city's most popular tourist attractions. Other popular attractions The Royal Ontario Museum The St. Lawrence Market Hockey Hall of Fame The Panorama Lounge (on the 51st floor of Manulife Centre) The Art Gallery of Ontario The Ontario Science Centre The Leslie Street Spit Toronto Zoo Little Glenn .